Dating a gibson 4 string tenor acoustic guitar


18-Apr-2020 08:28

This means that tenor banjo/guitar, mandola and mando-cello can all be played using the same scales and chord shapes.

One transitional instrument also tuned CGDA and closely related to the development of the tenor guitar is the tenor lute, a wooden instrument with a teardrop shaped body and a tenor banjo neck.

If you have any vintage gibson guitars that are posted on this site ,you are always welcome to post a review,comment or detailed features ,im sure other guitar players who visit us would love to know ...

In the case of Martin and Gibson this was in 1927, and it is undoubtedly linked to the beginnings of a trend away from the banjo, as the main rhythm instrument in jazz bands and dance orchestras, and towards the guitar, whether four or six string.The tenor banjo's sharp and cutting sonority, partly derived from its tuning in fifths, compared to that of the more mellow six string guitar, was particularly suited to the newly emerging, but still primitive, technology of acoustically recording this type of music onto acetate or metal discs which were then used as moulds for pressing the familiar black discs.It is not surprising, therefore, that some of the earliest tenor guitars were also built by banjo manufacturing companies which they could possibly have seen initially as a way to expand their markets, and then eventually maintain their markets.The tenor guitar is tuned exactly like a tenor banjo, and one of the major roles of the tenor guitar has been to allow tenor banjo players, and possibly mandolin family players, because of their similar tunings, to instantly double on the guitar without having to learn the scales and chord shapes for the entirely different tuning of a six string guitar.

In music there is the diatonic scale, or "do re mi fa so la ti do".

In musical letters this scale would be "C D E F G A B C".



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